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e-mail etiquette or learn to not apply to yobs by - m. john? >> what about the educational system that encourages them to not get themselves in damaging experiences and documents on line. but think more. it is a solution to help better kid's repitations . >> -- reputations. >> what do you want to see in the potential hires john? >> i am worried about a person that is motivated. if you don't have a motivated person. hire them to be motivated. you twitter has a lot of people in trouble. employers have to show since, too. these are kids being kids. >> thank you everyone. coming up. america's best days are behind us. that is it what 50 percent of the americans are now saying. what someone here says they are 100 percent wrong. the best is yet to come. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> hello eeverybody. i am yuma inn
to yobs by - m. john? >> what about the educational system that encourages them to not get themselves in damaging experiences and documents on line. but think more. it is a solution to help better kid's repitations . >> -- reputations. >> what do you want to see in the potential hires john? >> i amorried about a person that is motivated. if you don't have a motivated person. hire them to be motivated. you twitter has a lot of people in trouble. employers have to show since, too. these are kids being kids. >> thank you everyone. coming up. america's best days are behind us. that is it what 50 percent of the americans are now saying. what someone here boehner. we'll have more on america's news headquarters. accident >> take a good look in the rear view mirror. half of americans think that is where america's best days are, behind us. look at history and you will see the best day are ahead, how so? >> i believe we havee torst congress in the history of is country, but we are the same country that invted the telephone and telegraph and first more than on the moon came from this country. we
-mail etiquette or learn to not apply to yobs by - m. john? >> what about the educational system that encourages them to not gethemselves in damaging experiences and documents on line. but think more. it is a solution to help better kid's repitations . >> -- reputations. >> what do you want to see in the potential hires john? >> i am worried about a person that is motivated. if you don't have a motivated person. hire them to be motivated. you twitter has aot of people in trouble. employers have to show since, too. these are kids being kids. >> thank you everyone. coming up. america's best days are behind us. that is it what 50 percent of the americans are now saying. the americans are now saying. what someone here at a dry cleaner, the americans are now saying. what someone here we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. officemax can help you drive supply costs... down... ...and down. just use your maxperks card and
and he only been working at goodyear just a little over one year. he had less education unless experience. and he already made $600 more a month than i did from a lower paying job. the judge calculated my two years backpay, and i was given 30,000 per year. so i left the courtroom with $360,000. the headlines said from california to chicago to new york and florida, all across this nation -- the headlines read jacksonville, alabama, woman awarded $3.8 million from goodyear tire and rubber. they say that i got that money. the gadsden headline said that as well. i got a lot of compliments of the headlines in the news. well, that was 2003. he went to the 11th circuit record and then my guilt was hurt in the supreme court in november of 2006. life goes on. we had our normal family life the best we could do. but i worked the case just like it was a job. i called over 100 people to find the people that we needed to testify on my behalf. people were afraid of losing their jobs. they were so afraid. that is why they switched over. most of this was color coded. but life went on and my husband had tw
incorporate themselves into the whole education process, because they don't have the ability to maximize all the education they're receiving because they can't go to college or they feel like they can't do this because they don't have a social security card or can't apply for financial aid. it seems like, i'm going to go to work in a few minutes, and a lot of my kids are going to learn what i'm going to teach today and they won't feel like they can do anything with it. host: has it changed since the -- since president obama announced this defered deportation -- >> caller: i have a few -- a lot of the kids i teach aren't old enough yesterday to apply for the document. i teach middle school, but a lot of them are looking at the document as a way to get around that. but it's just the fact that, you know, we have people that i hear every day, and, you know, they were brought here -- everybody was brought here, you know what i mean? it just doesn't seem like we should be able to find a way to fully incorporate them. you know, just find a way to make them citizens just like and you myself and we c
of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order there will speak. he is a professor at the mit department of urban studies. he is an urban planner and political scientist. -- the deputy manager of the new york housing authority. he is a frequent adviser to trade unions and their efforts to work with immigrants and community groups across the united states. he is the author of a double trouble, black mayors, black communities, and the struggle for democracy. if he is writing a book on community building and development since the 1960's
when it comes to effective education policies. former chancellor of d.c. public schools michelle rhee takes us inside her state-by-state assessment but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> for some this is a happy forecast, for others who like the snow and cold, this isn't the week for you. this is a january thaw. we haven't had much of a winter. we were cold last week and this week completely different story. all the cold and cool air up in canada and mild, pacific air and warm air from the gulf of mexico streaming through the eastern half of the country. now, there will be some rainy spots. we'll talk about that in a second. look at these temperatures today. these are your highs today, mid-40s up through new york city. even chicago, near 40 degrees and all of the areas from kansas city, oklahoma city, dallas, right through the southeast well above average. now, we have rain, the worst weather in the country, by far, you're waking up to it from seattle and rainy, windy weather and rain around spokane and a couple more inches before it changes over to rain. we are warm a
. it was a continuation of the libertarian movement about which ron paul rose. he was educated to become the political thinker by the works of the rakes of hayek and they always embraced leonard read of the foundation about what change was about, on educating one mind at a time. ron paul has used politics is the tool for that libertarian goal and if you asked me 10 years ago, i would've said maybe with the best tool because he was merely describes your outlier in congress, but he's proven me 100% wrong using the tool of major party politics. he's been one of the greatest educators for libertarianism of our time as david said. it's not just about politics. the other sort of gap that ron paul bridges is key to his appeal is the apocalyptic ron paul who was at the same time to very hopeful ron paul. ron paul is one of the other politicians around who is willing to say, america is not necessarily the greatest khmer riches come of this wonderful nation in the world that can only do rate overseas and if there's anything wrong, for the other guy. in foreign policy terms, behavior overseas is actually in some
for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target and a major target by radicals who think it's a medal of honor to kill her and basically put fear in the hearts of the rest of population in the islamic world and who want to pursue education and rebellion. >> in fa
an american citizen. >> i became a u.s. citizen in 2001. >> you were educated at harvard and yale and johns hopkins. >> i have a m.a. and ph.d from harvard in history. >> george shultz was secretary of treasury and secretary of state -- in the nixon administration he was secretary of treasury. here he is. >> he came to me and said, john dean has just brought me a list of 50 people and wants a full investigation of them. that is a very unpleasant thing to have happen to you. what should i do? i said, do not do it. he said, what shall i tell john dean if he asks me how it is going? tell him if he has a problem he has to go to me. in the tapes there is discussion between the president and john dean about who do i think i am. but it was an improper use of the irs, and i would not do it. >> did you speak to the president about this? >> he never brought it up. >> this is really important. the private library made the argument -- and this is an argument school kids absorb -- that all presidents break the law and the difference is that richard nixon got caught. i felt that this was a terrible lesso
vital issues in the pending tray marked too difficult. so we've broken the monopoly of state education with free schools providing excellent education free to parents who send their children there. we've also established 2,000 academy schools. we've stopped dumbing down. we've introduced tough new powers on discipline in the classroom. there's a whole set of issues that are subject to this long-term reform from this government, issues like putting our universities on a sustainable footing so they can compete with the very best in the world and give everyone a chance to go to them irrespective of their background or income, modernizing our energy and transport infrastructure so we can keep up with our competitors in the global race, regulating our banks properly, so that immoral behavior and the gross mistakes of the past are not repeated. we're dealing with the challenges of an ageing population. we've reformed public-sector pensions so they are both affordable and fair for both public-sector workers and the taxpayer. in every case, we've put the national interest at the heart of this
an accidental erasure. there are too many starts and stops. it sounds to the educated year as if this has been the race eight times. -- erased eight times. someone in camp david or elsewhere erased it. i often wondered if it wasn't one person -- >> was? >> his dear friend and totally deniable. >> if the audience is frustrated by these little clips, the whole interviews are available on our website and the archive and the nixon library. >> you cann get them at nixonlibrary.gov. >> the interview -- where did you do it? >> the library. one of the things, if you watch these, there is the story of the role woodward and bernstein played. the role the house played and the senate played. the prosecutors, his army of prosecutors. do not forget the role played by republicans in the nixon administration. he was one of them -- he was not alone. we would hear from a few more. >> here he is -- he was at the time? >> deputy attorney general of the united states. >> it was clear he was not going to carry out that order. he turned to me and said, what are you going to do? i told him -- i do not think it is clo
on transparency of the public sources. it means fighting for justice in terms of education for the population so that they can work with determination to make their contribution to rebuilding their respective economies. the success knows no frontiers. and my officers will be dedicated, not only to getting haitians into the schools, to keeping up the fight against corruption, to establishing a rule of law, and my hope and trust is that the results will come. within less than two years, more than a million children have been left by the wayside now have free access to education. without any effort other than what has come from our treasury. already the effort for reconstruction is paying off with more than 1 million homeless people finding accommodation. and part of this, these benefits, come from the money, from you, the taxpayer's. and i say to them, all of our gratitude, to ensure that their solidarity has not been wasted. those who are most vulnerable are the ones who benefit the most. we wish well a country based on rule of law, and it is taking shape in front of our eyes, but yet the institu
the list of people -- of the really wealthy people and what they paid in taxes. it's a real education to go become and look at that. and i can't imagine what that education would look like today. if you had the same two pieces of information. >> host: one more question before we go to calls. you said you have to -- do you have to be a so-called egyptologist to read bills. >> guest: the taxes are the most demanding. it's not so much you have to have any special training. you just have to be patient. you have to read it and then try to follow it through. go back through it to see exactly who it applies to. some of these were actually quite obscure. some in terms of special interest provisions and a company incorporated in some state on such and such date, required us to then go to that state and very often go through whatever the filings were for them. one thing we ran across had to do with one company which issued 97 million in bonds or something like that. so, we had some of the database people who inquired, will you search this lexus, and see if anybody issued a bond in that amount. and su
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
this house, you walked him through the process. a >> that's right, educate aboutss the closing process, the application process. >> reporter: andy schnegenberger u showed us another neighborhood reynoldstown. it was first settled by freed slaved after the civil war.s today, working class families want to move in. schnegenberger directs non- profit groups like resources for communities, which guide first- time buyers through the mortgage process. the folks that you typically deal with, give me a sense of who they are? >> so our member organizations work with families that are typically low- to moderate- income, you know, annual incomes of $30,000 to $50,000 to $60,000 a year. >> reporter: the new rules are designed it to protect them from risky loans and the banks from borrowers taking a loan they cannot afford. they cap total debt payments at no more than 43% of a borrower's income; mandate a consumer's financial records be verified; ban interest-only loans and limit large payments calledo balloons due at the end of a loan. but schnegenberger is also worried regulators could tinker wit
cooperative agreement from the u.s. department of education through the public broadcasting service. broadcasting service ♪ every day when you're walking down the street ♪ ♪ everybody that you meet has an original point of view. ♪ ( laughs ) ♪ and i say hey! ♪ hey! ♪ what a wonderful kind of day ♪ ♪ if we could learn to work and play ♪ ♪ and get along with each other ♪ ♪ you got to listen to your heart ♪ ♪ listen to the beat ♪ ♪ listen to the rhythm, the rhythm of the street ♪ ♪ open up your eyes open up your ears ♪ ♪ get together and make things better by working together ♪ ♪ it's a simple message and it comes from the heart ♪ ♪ believe in yourself ♪ ♪ for that's the place to start ♪ ♪ and i say hey! ♪ hey! ♪ what a wonderful kind of day ♪ ♪ if we could learn to work and play ♪ ♪ and get along with each other. ♪ hey! ♪ what a wonderful kind of day ♪ ♪ hey! what a wonderful kind of day. ♪ hey! arthur: hey, d.w. hey! whoa! ( crash ) ( dramatic music plays ) buster ( narrating ): "tr
tax cuts and fighting with the teachers union over tenure, pay and education reforms, but he now preaches reconciliation in his address tuesday afternoon. and jon, he did that, but he never once compromised a single value. he fought the unions. he won. he got the unions coming to him to reform schools. and he's fought budget battles, and he's won. he's won them on his terms, but he doesn't vilify the democrats. he works with them. and this is -- again, for some reason, for some reason in washington, d.c., and with certain members of the conservative entertainment complex that follow washington, d.c., actually working with the other side and winning is seen as a political sin. >> yeah. the one nuance i'd add to that is from the bleachers is it reflects of ideological warfare is the problem. politics is about ideas. it should be. fights over education, fights over taxes are important. it's just the fact when you invest everything in your eye delogical position and decline to recognize that the nature of a republic is to give mutual concessions of opinion or we're not going to make
, to engage and educate them and remind them that the party dynamic is not positive for any of us. >> it looks like you are about to jump in. >> i was just going to say that my starting point is where people are. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with y
there are barriers for women to move into these corporals or into these law firms? do we have an education system supporting women in this process? it comes down to how we are supporting the family structure. that is often what it comes down to. and that is a question for more and more men today. you think about men who are on the part of track and women who are on this mommy track. -- men who are on this partner track and women who are on this mommy track. i know more and more men who want to go coach soccer at night. host: there is a story in psychology today in january talk about women voting and the psychology behind it. part of the information was the data behind the pilot test. guest: it is tough. we just did some research this post-election. there has always been a sense that women will vote for women. women will vote for women if they really see that woman in a way that she is accomplished, viable, and have the same belief system. it is more likely women will vote for democrats first. and there is an 18-point gender gap in the presidential alexian. and it went to president obama. -- in th
to educate around these breakthrough technologies. and it really is part of a game changing opportunity. we think technologies, plural, will continue to refine and develop not only those technologies but many others. >> you under thank you for doing this. >> good to see you again. >> you mentioned the keystone pipeline a couple times in your speech but i wonder if you could come if you have an assessment whether my president obama will reject or approve the pipeline? if he does reject it won't be the political consequences be? >> we are hopeful that he will approve it, and right now we are encouraged i what we're hearing from the white house. obviously, as a result of alleged report coming from the state of nebraska, the governor has to make a final decision that may affect the department of state. but we're hopeful the president will approve. i think we'll look at it from a jobs perspective, from the energy needs of the united states, as prime minister harper said on a number of occasions, it's a no-brainer. so we're hopeful the president will step forward. i think will be an early indicat
educating the american public. if we don't do that, we will lose it. when you look at medicare social security disability trust fund, it comes to a head. if you don't show people how this president has scared people over the last four years, with about 2008. a lot more needs to come about that is real and genuine. let's actually take these numbers and show people why social security and medicare are running on a pathway to destruction. i think we should be able to put this budget and this administration and the senate back on track through the power of the purse. month by month, quarter by quarter. good behavior and not bad behavior be one it will be interesting year ahead without any question. @%would like to say th i believe that the idea that there is some room to set aside the fact that the congress and the senate have a 10% approval rating on the par of the american people, it will be doggone difficult to take on the position of lecturer or instructor. what we need a straightforwardness and simplicity on the part of our elected representatives. >> i'm glad i'm from the house beca
what climate is and being able to educate people as to the difference, but when you have these superstorms that are coming it doesn't matter if there was a cold day you know, we almost lost our biggest city. >> john: now we're having the storm of the century every other year. joe, last fall, al gore called on president obama to include a carbon tax in his fiscal cliff negotiations. that didn't happen. a lot of progressives were rooting for it. do you think -- you jump in, tina, if you want, do you think there's any chance we'll see this president say the words carbon tax? >> cap and trade was a republican idea they abandoned just like they abandoned their healthcare initiative. the individual mandate was something that nixon came out with. basically, the formula is -- republican idea and obama says that's a great idea, suddenly it is no longer a good idea when you're a republican. >> exactly. if it comes out of the president's mouth chances are it is a nonstarter among a certain segment. remember, we had a convention not too long ago in tampa where president obama was act
education. beginning with harvard and georgetown. but that never disqualified anybody. tip o'neill 93 and '94, special to president clinton. and that's what john harwood was talking about. incredible expertise with the budget. moving on in 2006, new york university as executive advice president. then a stint at citigroup. first at global wealth management and next in a controversy by the way that comes up with a large bonus he got while citigroup was getting tart money. finally reenter the administration. i'm sure the administration will make a cot of, as secretary in charge of of resource management. and second stint of omb. then white house chief of staff to the present. let's look at positive. some private sector banking experience. that ends up being a negative. close to the president, you have treasury secretaries with more or less connections to the white house. . finally ton negatives, is this the guy you want in office during financial crisis like you had with geithner with his experience at the new york fed? not really viewed as a banker. doesn't know finance man sters. that
bill so today's returning heros can get their education too. having co-chaired our advisory board he knows our forces collect, analyze and depend on good intelligence. chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travels together in the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies and with friends. as successful businessman, he knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by strategy and keep our military the strongest force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly chuck knows that war is not an on stra obstruction. he understands sending young americans to fight in dirt, mud, is something we only have to do when necessary. it is geared towards the guy at the bot doing the fighting and dying. with chuck our troops will also know just like sarge et hague el was there for his other brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represent the bipartisan pra tradition that we need more up in washington. for his independence and commitmen
groth and education in her own contry. she will live with their parents and o brothers in the u.k. was a continues to receive treatment good news. meanwhile, the jobs report showing the slight growth. not really moving the economic neil. presence dollar an american enterprise institute and former consultanto the treasury department and steve son, president of capital public affairs and a former labor department official. all-starith you. where can i get -- what you make of this report? >> 455,000, which was the jobs increases, the average for the past couple of years. what is really sriking about this is this is the best we will e for a while. gerri: what? >> yeah. normally at the start of the year we're looking at big stimulus. last year payroll tax cut help fr the fed. on average since 2008 the stimulus of the srt of the year has been three and 55 billion. this year its-270000000000. so we go from of big tailwind to a big head wind. this isthe best numbers we can do at this point, wait until those tax cuts, people and get their payroll, thir paychecks. gerri: let's let steve a
their education too. having co-chaired my intelligence advisory board, he knows that our armed forces collect, analyze, and depend on good intelligence. chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw in in our travels together across the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest and we stand with allies and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows that even as we made tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe more importantly, chuck knows that war is not an ab strakz. he understands that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. with chuck our troops will always know just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represents the bipart sfwlan tradition that
, but to educate, teach you how the market works. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. the script right now says the companies are supposed to be performing horribly. we're supposed to be geared for disappointment. which makes it so unfathomable that the averages rally today. dow gaining 62 points, s&p rising .27%, nasdaq climbing .45%. what do you do? i have to put myself in the mind of the market. what do you do when a gigantic fortune 200 company you haven't heard of but with everything with testament -- what do you do when they say things are much better than expected? how do you spin that story negatively, darn it? particularly when the stock jumps $2.12? how confounding and totally off message is the announcement from striker, the medical device company with a broad array of products designed to make your body work better, even when it's aging rapidly, like mine, that sales are well above what wall street was looking for? what gives here? rallied on $1.41. didn't anyone tell those guys or their customers that the affordable care act is going to make their product unaffordable? or make them
of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling an effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. -- and effort to get yourself where you're in a position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as a fracking. and conventional means of extracting oil and gas. -- unconvential means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of whetheather ths agricultureverage purchase o sector. there are some points of hope within that structure is generally true that the low- paying jobs -- structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs a
paid more, but they thought it was too much of a headache. there is much to be done to educate the older generation of publishers to understand that they will have to engage on every level with their audiences in the next phase. >> my name is jeff roberts, former broadcast journalist. winston churchill famously said democracy is the worst possible form of government. i am curious what country you think might be doing a better job in disseminating news through the mass media where it is not as hysterical, not as pointed as our news coverage is. does anybody do it better, or is this just the way it is in free society? i hope you don't say great britain. >> i think this is the way it is. if you go to europe, you will find that they did not seem to go through this golden age. the big newspapers there are not owned by parties, they are affiliated with parties in their ideology. the editorial page and the news pages will work together to report stories, where you are we have this great fire wall between the editorial pages and the news pages. i do think this is the worst possible med
are being created. the jobs that going begging right now, the ones the require a lot of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling and effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as fracking. and unconventional means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of weather this year, the agriculture sector. there are some points of hope within that structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs are where the action is right now. host: marlin is joining us from illinois. caller: i have bee
habits are hard to change. emigre: they grow up with the education that all jewish people, they are rich, they are clever. they are all the troubles of the russian people. it was their education. emigre: we noticed more and more in the newspapers and on the television that the soviet government was supporting anti- semitism. we realized that for the sake of our children we must we realized that for the sake of our children we must go. eckstein: this plane ticket may look like any other plane ticket, but this one is didifferent because this plane ticket can bring a jew in the former soviet union home to israel, to the land of milk and honey. there's just one catch. this ticket has a time limit. the doors of opportunity and emigration to israel are open now. we don't know how long those doors will remain open. so, won't you go to your phone now and help sponsor one individual, one ticket, one new life that you can plant in the land of israel. announcer: "on wings of eagles" is a modern day fulfillment of scriptural prophecy. over a million of the scattered remnants of the children of isra
need to be educated more and we need to have like public service ads reminding parents who own guns to look them up because people are so stupid. >> stephanie: right. >> caller: you know, it's just -- come on. and maybe if we legalize drugs we'll get rid of gangs and drugs. >> stephanie: there are so many aspects of this. michael moore was talking about how many times we kill women in this country, and how many times it is an ex and a gun involved. if there is a gun around it makes it a lot easier to kill somebody or, quote unquote, resolve some issue that is tragic. >> and if you lock up your guns to protect your family then if there is an intruder you don't have the time to get the gun. >> stephanie: right. and that's the thing with teacher, literally they would have to be rambo -- they would have to have a military assault weapon on their person at all times, right? seriously -- there was controversy of teachers hugging or not -- >> no, to bulky. >> stephanie: no, nobody hugging. seventeen minutes after the hour. back with right-wing world and more next o
that allows them to deal with those tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. and i think that's where we look at our responsibility as, is to help them navigate that decision. that's a personal decision and a hard decision. and let that decision be on the family members and the provider. but we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that it's not, um, promising, is the right way to do. and so you take it from a cost discussion to a quality of life discussion. and to me, when you make that quality of life discussion and make the right decision, the cost discussion are bear out -- will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what's going to lead to the efficiencies to eliminate waste and to bring down the cost of the entire health care system. >> i probably just answered the question he was trying to ask me 15 different times. >> the devil, of course, is in the details. >> yeah. >> who is going to be making these decisions as to whether care is provided or not? we all remember it wasn't so long ago that thanks to our insuranc
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have an education problem, with the end consumer. and the housing market. but i do agree, and i happened to catch a bit earlier, that you know, looking at a house as an investment versus utility, that dynamic has been ebbing and flowing. i hope it stays with the latter. because i think the former and all the home equity loans and all the college educations paid for has never fully been vetted and accounted for. >> so rick can i just try this another way. let's say you were going to get a new carburetor for one of your 1965 lincolns out there and the guy at the auto parts store recognized you, rick santelli, i'm thinking about getting a mortgage now. is now the time to do it or are rates going to go lower or higher? >> do it now. do it now. do it now. i've been saying that for the last year or so. and i still think it's a wonderful idea. i think it's a speck in history, this is all for the buyers that can get financing. no doubt. >> john, what's your take on the direction of mortgage rates? >> i think that they're not going to move a lot this year. i think the fed is going to do
going after people who aren't able to make an educated decision regarding their nutrition? frankly it's insulting to us, it's insulting to our customers, it's insulting to the ebb tire latino community. >> des, i sat through bill ackman's presentation live and one of the most compelling parts of it was when he put up images of your brochure for herbalife clothes which looked beautiful and gorgeous, and then went in what he described as real life, they sent cameras around the country to look at some of these quote/unquote clubs and they looked very different. they look nothing like the brochure. they had no signage on the outside. there was no lights. literally the windows were closed. they were in horrible neighborhoods. it just, the whole thing, i have to say, it was one of those moments in the room where i think a lot of people said, huh. what did you make of that? >> you know, andrew forgive me. but you characterize those neighborhoods as horrible neighborhoods. let me tell you, that's where -- that may not be where you live, andrew, it may not be where mr. anman lives but the real
, centennial, colorado. thank you very much. at 6:30, we'll talk with anne bremner. >>> the education of john boehner, a revealing interview in "the wall street journal." he says one thing stunned him more than anything else in the fight over the fiscal cliff. when the president told him behind closed door, we don't have a spending problem, we have a health care problem. boehner was astonished by the comment. he said "i need this job like a need a hole in the head." >>> senate majority leader harry reid is taking heat in louisiana after saying the devastation caused by hurricane katrina was nothing in comparison to superstorm sandy. the nevada democrat made the controversial comments on the senate floor while complaining that congress is has taken too long to address the sandy aid. >> we are now past two months with the people of new york, and the people of new orleans and that area, they were hurt, but nothing in comparison to the people in new england. >> i can see why that raised some eyebrows. head to cnn.com/earlystart for our blog. follow us on twitter and facebook. >>> 15 minutes past
the poison got into his system. >>> two oregon men chose an odd way to educate people about legally carrying weapons as they claim was their goal. they hoped people would engage them in conversation. instead, frightened residents in portland called 911 when they saw assault weapons strapped to their backs. despite the panic, the men really didn't break the law. they are licensed to carry the weapons. >>> the little film that could, and she's the little actress that did. 9-year-old quvenzhane wallis was nominated for her role as hush puppy in "beasts of the southern wild." young youngest best actress nominee ever. she told us her reaction when she got the good news. >> in the hotel room, half asleep, saw my name just rolling down like this. and on the inside i was excited, and just sitting there, boom! i hear stuff just speaking about the film, you, me, stuff like that. >> how sweet is she? "beast of the southern wilds" received four oscar nominations in all. one for best picture and one for its director as well. >> a lot of buzz about that movie. >> such a perfect 9-year-old reaction. there
and educated in paris, raised in normandy. welcome to the program. >> thank you for having me. stuart: we find it hard to believe french socialists are having second thoughts about a 75% tax which we thought they love the. are they missing gerard depardieu? >> i guess they are. we are not surprised that people are reacting so vibrantly to this punishing tax rate. i am always astounded that to realize lawmakers are actually surprised that taxpayers won't allow them to subject them to these punishing rates. stuart: i want to move to a second subject. i understand that the government in paris is actively moving against american corporations accusing them of non-payment for avoiding taxation. what are they doing and is that statement accurate? >> it is accurate but it is a typical french government response, reminds me of my 8-year-old, the dog ate my homework type of thing. this is a high taxation that is complaining it has -- the deuce with the golden age because of its high taxes and instead of actually doing some in your thinking and thinking what do we do to retain, what can we do so these co
for the g.i. bill so today's heroes can get their education too. having chaired my advisory board he knows that our intelligence collect, analyze and depend on good intelligence and chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travels together across the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy and keep the military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, chuck knows that war is not an abstraction. he knows that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. chuck, our troops will always know, just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represents the
they say publicly? >> it's a big deal. what this will do, it will change the education of their officers and their noncommissioned officers, and the training itself to focus on counter insurgency, which is a different form of warfare and it needs a skegs set o special set of skill sets. jenna: what kind of role will we play potentially in that? will we be part of the training or making recommendations, or is this something that is really internal for their country? >> we have had quite an impact on this already. we have provided them manuals, we have brought people over, bonafide experts in this. they'll do the training themselves. we are also hoping that we have a major problem with pakistan as we have talked about before on this show, and that is, is that there are safe-havens as you mentioned inside of pakistan where the afghanistan taliban harbor, and the pakistanis are protecting them. we are hoping to make some progress with those safe havens as well. jenna: one of the reasons why that's so underlined if you will is because pakistan has nuclear weapons. no one really knows for sure
today's returning heroes can get their education, too. having co-chaired by intelligence advisory board he knows our armed forces collect, analyze, depend on good intelligence. chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travel across the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows even as we make tough fiscal choices we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, chuck knows that war is not a distraction. he understands that sending young americans to fight, bleed in the dirt, and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom, who is doing the fighting and the dying. with chuck, our troops will always know, just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represents the bipartisa
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